A recent letter to the letter caught my attention, and I felt it deserved a comment. The author was concerned that the moratorium on offshore drilling does not go far enough. She was promoting an upcoming webinar showing the effect of drilling on the Gulf Coast, including the waterways dredged through the marsh to provide a path for pipelines and drilling barges.

I am sure it will also show numerous oil spills in the marsh. Just remember, you will be watching this on a laptop or cellphone made possible by this drilling activity over the last 70 years. In fact, you need to remember that your shelter, transportation, food and every other aspect of your upscale and privileged life was made possible by the sacrifice of the people working in the petroleum industry along the Gulf Coast.

You also need to be aware that the oil companies have no interest in exploring for oil and gas in an area where they are not wanted. There are too many poverty-stricken countries around the world begging them to come and explore for oil on land or offshore of their territory.

They want to bring their country up to the same standard of living we had 50 years ago. So have no fear of drilling offshore in the Atlantic or Pacific in this country. I am just grateful that most people along the Gulf Coast did not have this holier-than-thou attitude of present day coastal elites 70 years ago.

Jim Harris

Brunswick

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