On Sept. 8, President Trump surprised the country by announcing a moratorium on offshore drilling in the Southeast Atlantic and Florida. Though we are pleased that he heard our collective voices of opposition, the federal moratorium does not go far enough.

With drilling, regular oil leaks and spills are expected, especially with the increase in intense storms across the Atlantic Ocean. Oil knows no boundaries — if drilling occurs anywhere on the East Coast, we all lose. The moratorium should be extended to include all Atlantic states.

The landscape surrounding the Gulf of Mexico is a good case study of how the oil industry affects a coast. After nearly 100 years of oil extraction, the Gulf landscape is defined by canals, pipelines, and refineries. After the BP Deepwater Horizon tragedy, more than 1,000 miles of beaches were ruined, with a $23 billion local impact over three years.

On Oct. 14 at 5:30pm, we have an online opportunity to learn from Healthy Gulf about the impact the oil industry has had on the Gulf Coast states. Dave Snyder with Halyards Restaurant Group and other leaders will also share about what oil and gas development would mean to businesses in Georgia and South Carolina. Please visit One Hundred Miles on Facebook for the full event details.

Alice Keyes

Brunswick

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