From the writings of the Rev. Billy Graham

Dear Dr. Graham:

I was once very popular having been the homecoming queen of my graduating class. I always felt loved and respected. Now that I am old and disabled, life has left me lonely. Why does the world seem to only love the beautiful, energetic and successful?

— D.P.

Dear D.P.: A few years ago a beautiful young Hollywood star ended her life. She left behind a note with a brief message — she was unbearably lonely. One of the most sought-after box-office draws, felt alone.

Then there is the story of Queen Victoria of England. After the death of her husband, she said, “There is no one left to call me Victoria.” Even a queen knew what it meant to be lonely. Author H. G. Wells said on his 65th birthday, “I have never found peace.” It seems unimaginable that such well-known people could be lonely.

Then there is the poor person living in a dingy apartment who never receives a phone call or letter — who never hears a word of encouragement, who never receives the clasp of a handshake. There are children isolated in orphanages. The loneliness of solitude affects individuals and whole societies.

The world can be a harsh and sometimes cruel environment, especially when we focus on ourselves. No one can understand loneliness like Jesus Christ. He was “despised and rejected by men, a Man of sorrows and acquainted with grief” (Isaiah 53:3). But Jesus did not only come to identify with mankind’s grief, He came to destroy the grief of sin, the grief of disappointment and the grief of loneliness. Because Jesus willingly bore the pain and paid the price to redeem our sinful natures, we can have full fellowship with Him forever.

So “draw near with confidence to the throne of grace, so that (you) may receive mercy and find grace to help” with every lonely need (Hebrews 4:16, NASB). Reach out to others who may have never known acceptance, and great blessing will come.