Dear Dr. Wallace:

You previously told a woman to leave her husband. That is terrible advice, as marriage is for life. Didn’t you ever attend a wedding and hear the minister say, “Till death do us part”? He said nothing about leaving when things got a little difficult.

My religion teaches that divorce is out of the question. I know you won’t print my letter because I disagree with you; still, I want you to read the Good Book before you tell a wife to leave her husband, even if they’re both 19.

— Not Happy With You, via email

Dear Not Happy: Marriage is a sacred commitment, but there are times when even that commitment has to be broken. Wife-beating is one of those times. I don’t know where in the Good Book it says a wife should endure being beaten by her cowardly husband.

A situation where a man is physically beating his wife goes way, way beyond “a little difficult,” as you inferred. Any time an individual’s personal safety is in question, immediate and decisive action must be taken in the name of protection, safety and personal security. Even though I greatly respect and believe wholeheartedly in the institution of marriage, I stand by my advice in the particular case you are referring to.

Dear Dr. Wallace: I am attending a new high school because I got into a fight at my old school. The girl I fought with wasn’t expelled, even though she told a teacher she was going to kill me. This situation became a big stink at my old school and was the talk of the campus for weeks. It seems my entire former school knew about this problem. I feel that all I did was defend myself, and yes, when things got physical, I did a good job of giving back even more than I was getting, if you get my drift.

My parents had me transferred to my new school because they were afraid for my safety at my old one. I hate my new school. The kids are stuck-up and unfriendly. Being here is like being in prison. When my new school plays my old school in sports events, I cheer for my old school.

I’m told that the girl who threatened me has been shipped back out of state to live with relatives there and won’t be returning to my old school, but my parents still say no to me going back to my old school. I think they are being unreasonable. Please help me.

— Unhappy Girl,

Tucson, Arizona

Dear Unhappy Girl: It’s not easy leaving familiar surroundings and friends, but I agree with your parents that changing schools was in your best personal interest.

It always takes time to adjust to a move. Getting involved in school activities is a good way of making new friends. All high schools have numerous clubs, associations and meetings where teens with similar interests gather and have fun together. Do yourself a big favor and get involved!

Stop feeling sorry for yourself. I guarantee that you will make new friends very soon. Your old high school is history to you now. Start cheering for your new one. And remember that grades are important, so do your very best in the classroom.

Write to Dr. Wallace at rwallace@galesburg.net.