ATLANTA (AP) — The largest safety-net hospital in Georgia said it will take most of the year to gut and rebuild three floors of the facility damaged by flooding.

The damage done to parts of Grady Memorial Hospital were originally thought to be fixed in three months but CEO John Haupert said Monday that the repairs would be finished in October, news outlets reported.

Haupert said time-consuming electrical upgrades, repairing drywall, wooden infrastructure, flooring and medical equipment forced the extended reconstruction time.

An HVAC water supply pipe on the sixth floor burst on Dec. 7 and flooded the facility. The damaged affected 220 bed spaces.

“Almost all of those items were saturated with water or had water in them,” Haupert said. “We really wouldn’t have been satisfied without a full gut renovation to assure us, the public, and patients that there wasn’t a risk of mold being within the building.”

While the three floors are renovated at Grady, Emory Healthcare has agreed to take 30 inpatients at its Hillandale hospital in Lithonia. Emory Decatur Hospital will help with Grady's obstetrics patients.

Most of the renovation cost and lost of business should be covered by the facility's property insurance Haupert said. Grady did not release cost estimates, saying it was still too early.

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