Nonprofit volunteers in the Golden Isles touch lives in ways that make a true difference in the communities they serve.

For those who want to take a more active role, the Community Leadership Council is offering an eight-week course designed to identify, recruit and place diverse leaders into nonprofit board and leadership positions throughout the region.

The training sessions, a program of United Way of Coastal Georgia, are held on Thursday mornings from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. beginning on April 2.

The training sessions include a Birkman Assessment review, board member responsibilities, fundraising, strategic planning, and financial and legal decision making.

After completing the eight-week course, participants will serve a one-year internship on the board of a local nonprofit of their choice.

Participants will be full, non-voting members of the board, serve on at least one committee or assist on a special project.

A selection committee will review all applications and select no more than 15 participants per class. The selection criteria are designed to recruit demonstrated leaders diverse in ethnicity, professions and community service.

A desire to make a positive difference in the community is the main criteria. Those not selected will be at the top of the list for next year’s session.

Those selected will sign a letter of agreement outlying the requirements for successful completion of the program and pay a non-refundable $200 commitment fee. The fee can be paid by the participant or the employer.

Applications are being selected until Feb. 21. Completed applications along with a recent headshot should be submitted to communityleadershipcouncil@gmail.com.

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