101218_flashback friday

The front page of The News from Oct. 9, 1968 is shown.

25 Years

(Oct. 9-12, 1993)

Halfway through the football season, things were not looking good for one Ray Goff and his Georgia Bulldogs. At 1-4 — 0-4 in the Southeastern Conference for the first time — UGA President Charles Knapp was left to tell reporters that Goff was safe in his job “as far as my eyes can see at this point.”

The AP reported, “Knapp told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that he has not considered firing Goff. Knapp said that he, athletics director Vince Dooley and top financial contributors are confident of the program’s direction under Goff. He called on Georgia fans to rally behind the coach.

“‘I think the right person to put it on track is Ray Goff, and I think he will do it,’ Knapp said. ‘(Firing Goff) is not something that we have contemplated or plan on contemplating.’

“Georgia is 16-17 in SEC games under Goff, and the fifth-year coach is 2-7 against Florida, Tennessee and Alabama. Knapp wouldn’t speculate on what would happen if Georgia finished 1-10 or 2-9.

“‘It’s painful right now,’ Knapp said. ‘I wouldn’t want to minimize the importance of losing four SEC games. But it is a temporary and I think a cyclical issue.’”

Meanwhile, D.C. was buzzing with news that the Republicans were bringing in one of the world’s best-known living communists to speak at a Senate fundraiser. None other than Mikhail Gorbachev himself was slated as the “featured attraction” for a November event for the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

“It’s sort of capitalism at its finest — using all available resources,” GOP strategist Ann Stone told the AP. “It’s either capitalism at its finest or its most bizarre.”

Eddie Mahe, another GOP consultant, said it’s necessary to vary the entertainment for a high-dollar donor class that’s seen and done much of what the political fundraising world has to offer.

“They’ve heard and met and had their picture taken with every political leader and celebrity in the country,” Mahe said. “It’s awfully hard to come up with something new and different that’s an attraction.”

50 Years

(Oct. 9, 1968)

Vaughn Mancha, the Florida State athletics director and former All-American at Alabama, spoke to the Brunswick-Glynn County Quarterback Club and said FSU had eyes on moving into the SEC, should the opportunity present itself.

“But they have 10 teams now and want to keep an even number,” Mancha said. “If Georgia Tech were to go back in, we could probably get in.”

Mancha said FSU doesn’t especially enjoy having to play games against opponents further away, like Texas A&M and Baylor.

“We don’t like playing an ‘international’ schedule,” Mancha said. “There’s nothing like playing against your neighbors — such as Georgia, Auburn and Alabama. That’s why we would like to join the SEC. Maybe Tech doesn’t need the conference. We sure need it.”

The News reported, “Mancha, who kept club members roaring throughout his talk by poking fun at old acquaintances, said FSU recruits heavily in the South Georgia area. ‘We feel Georgia boys are the best anywhere.’ He praised Brunswick’s Johnny Pittman, senior fullback for the Seminoles.”

75 Years

(Oct. 7. 1943)

Syndicated columnist H.R. Baukhage found himself and his fellow reporters as the subjects of interest during a media event at the White House.

“The other day, at the president’s usual press and radio conference, I was interrupted, for Fala, the president’s scotty, walked out between the forest of legs and made one of the most thorough trouser-cuff inspections I had ever seen,” Baukhage wrote.

“Unfortunately, I had on one of those liberty suits with no cuffs so he started to pass me by and I had to engage him in conversation to get his attention at all.

“What he said was not to be attributed — I can only say that I learned from authoritative Scotch circles that the newspaper and radio fraternity displayed a lot of scents.”

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