Concerns over a potentially dangerous blend of marijuana laced with the powerful narcotic fentanyl has prompted Glynn County Police to urge local pot smokers to destroy their stash.

County police narcotics officers report operations this week “have resulted in seizures of cannabis/marijuana laced with the highly addictive opioid Fentanyl,” the department said in a public health advisory issued Thursday afternoon. Fentanyl often contributes to drug overdoses when dealers lace it into other street drugs, typically heroin.

County police urge those who have recently bought marijuana on the streets to destroy it. Because Fentanyl can lead to “acute respiratory distress and even death,” police warned that marijuana laced with the narcotic carries “the potential for a fatal dosage.”

“We encourage persons who have acquired cannabis/marijuana within the past few days to destroy or dispose of it in a safe and environmentally friendly way that will not risk others to a potential exposure to fentanyl,” police said in the advisory. “Do not flush the substance as this will contaminate the water supply.”

Police reminded residents that a person cannot be charges for possession of any illegal drugs discovered as a result of the person seeking medical care for an overdose.

Those in need of drug or alcohol addiction treatment can contact the 24-hour Georgia Crisis and Access line at 800-715-4225.

Armed with a search warrant Wednesday, police seized 24 grams of fentanyl, 17 grams of marijuana, a handgun and $3,500 cash during a raid at a room at the Super 8 by Wyndham motel at 211 Palisade Drive. The investigation also included the search of a vehicle in the parking lot of the hotel, located near Interstate 95 in southern Glynn County.

Police arrested Chas Trammell, 36, and Alfred Smith, 39, and charged both men with possession of narcotics.

County police officer Earl Wilson said this incident was “partially” responsible for the decision to issue the public health advisory.

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